The Dermatology Center of Long Island

Dr. Joel L. Lamm

Board Certified Dermatologist

516-933-1717

The Dermatology Center of Long Island

Dr. Joel L. Lamm

Board Certified Dermatologist

516-933-1717

400 S. Oyster Bay Road
Hicksville, NY 11801

OFFICE OPENING BEGINNING MAY 18, 2020
Dr. Lamm will be available on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons.
Please call the office to schedule your appointment.
The receptionist will go over our safety procedures.

Rashes

A "rash" is a general term for inflammation of the skin. There are many causes of a rash, such as allergic or irritant dermatitis, autoimmune disease, infections, medications, and, rarely, cancer of the skin.

Allergic contact dermatitis is a skin condition that arises after contact with a chemical from which you have developed an allergy. Common allergens are found in makeup, soaps, detergents, colognes, various plants such as poison ivy, or other chemical that may be found at home or in the workplace. It is sometimes necessary to do allergy testing to determine which chemical may be causing the rash.

Irritant contact dermatitis
is similar in appearance to allergic contact dermatitis, although the etiology is different. It is caused by contact to various chemicals that we use everyday for cosmetic or cleaning purposes, as well as from chemicals in the workplace. These chemicals cause the skin to become inflamed from direct irritation, but not due to an allergic reaction.

Autoimmune disease of the skin is caused by an abnormal response by the immune system. These diseases are often exacerbated by sun exposure. Some examples of autoimmune disease include Psoriasis and Lupus. It is important to evaluate these diseases to ensure that other organs are not involved.
Infection of the skin can cause a rash as well. Bacteria, fungi, and viruses can all affect the skin. Bacterial diseases generally appear as pustules, tender crusted areas, or in ring like patches (Lyme disease).

Fungal diseases such a ringworm or athletes foot are also very common.

Viral diseases can present as rashes, either directly such a herpes, chicken pox, and shingles, or indirectly as a rash appearing during a viral illness, such as roseola.

Medications are a frequent cause of rash. Basically, any medication can cause a rash to develop in any person. Common medications that cause a rash include antibiotics, and medications for high blood pressure and cholesterol.

Cancer of the skin can present as a skin rash, but it's rare. Superficial skin cancers, such as basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma can present as scaly pink patches. Lymphoma of the skin can present as a scaly rash on the body.

Rash Treatment

Treatment for skin rashes varies according to the type of rash and its cause. In most cases, rashes caused by viruses resolve on their own over the course of days or weeks and do not require treatment, except to reduce itching. Anti-itching lotions, oatmeal baths, and aloe vera gel may provide relief. To reduce the risk for scarring and secondary infections from scratching, fingernails should be kept short and clean, especially in young children.

Mild rashes that worsen when the air is cold and dry can be treated using moisturizer during the winter months. Topical creams and ointments, including over-the-counter and prescription-strength corticosteroids such as hydrocortisone, and non-steroidal medications, may also be used. Long-term use of corticosteroids may cause thinning of the skin and infections.

Antibiotics: Skin infections, bacterial or fungal, may be treated using antibiotics, which can be applied to the skin using creams ointments, or taken orally, or prescription anti-fungal creams. Antihistamines reduce itching and may cause drowsiness, providing more restful sleep when taken at bedtime.

Phototherapy: involves using ultraviolet A and/or B light waves to treat mild to moderate skin rashes such as psoriasis, in adults and children over the age of 12. In some cases, a drug called psoralen is used in combination with phototherapy. Patients who are receiving phototherapy are monitored carefully during treatment. Long-term side effects include premature aging of the skin and skin cancer.

Corticosteroids
: When topical treatments are ineffective, physicians may prescribe systemic corticosteroids such as prednisone, which are taken orally or injected into muscle instead of being applied to the skin. Corticosteroids should not be discontinued suddenly and the dosage is tapered off gradually. They are used only for short periods of time because long-term use can cause serious side effects.

Immunosuppressive drugs such as Cyclosporine may be used in adults to treat severe skin rashes that do not respond to other treatments.

Dr. Joel L. Lamm

Board Certified Dermatologist

516-933-1717

400 S. Oyster Bay Road
Hicksville, NY 11801

OFFICE OPENING BEGINNING MAY 18, 2020
Dr. Lamm will be available on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons.
Please call the office to schedule your appointment.
The receptionist will go over our safety procedures.

My Image

p. 516-933-1717
f. 516-933-6851
info@lammdermatology.com

2020 Lamm Dermatology.
© The Dermatology Center of Long Island.
All rights reserved.

Site designed and powered by:
TZDesignstudio.net